Sunday, January 29, 2012

$3.4 Billion owed to IRS by delinquent federal workers and retirees




To solve this problem, Congress will likely pass another law… exempting them from accountability.

Government has long been out of control.  It is again election year.  Please VOTE.


3 comments:

Glenn B said...

My guess would be, if you looked at the federal workers who are delinquent on their taxes and compared it to the general population, you would find the results for each to be very similar. in other words, it is not like federal employees are different than anyone else but that is just my guess based upon my own experience as a federal worker. When it came to taxes, in my 32 year career as a federal employee, I was never once delinquent on my federal taxes. That means (defining what delinquent would be in this case) that I never paid my federal taxes late - I was always on time. That I always had my withholdings set at a rate that did not make me incur a penalty for not having paid enough on time. That I never, not even once, cheated on my federal taxes (nor my state taxes for that matter nor my local taxes when I had to pay local income taxes). It also means I never made a mistake on my federal taxes whereby I owed them more money (I did make at least a couple where they owed me more in my refund.) I know of only one fellow worker who was routinely delinquent on his taxes. He got in quite a bit of trouble over it and was eventually fired for that among other things.

So what is tax delinquency? Now, if someone owed the federal government a few dollars they would be considered delinquent just as if they did not pay at all. If they paid a day late, maybe because of illness or just because they missed the deadline because of forgetfulness, they would be considered delinquent. Of course, if they cheated or purposefully did not pay on time they would also be considered delinquent. If, of course, the federal government said: "Hey, Joe Blow, you owe us $500 in taxes" he would be considered delinquent until the matter was resolved. Guess what, they did it to me at least once and they were WRONG. I did not owe one cent but was considered delinquent until I answered the charge and proved my side. Just coming out and saying that x number of federal employees are delinquent means a whole lot less than many think, at least until you have some more facts about how they are seen as delinquent.

To say, Congress will vote in someway to negate the whole thing of delinquency is ludicrous. The fact is that Congressmen are flaunting these numbers to show they are on the ball and will fight to correct such delinquencies not to just brush them under the carpet. Yet again, as I said above, x number of delinquencies means little until each case is fully resolved and until you have the facts on what is considered a delinquency.

If it works out that federal workers are actually delinquent at a rate far above the general public, then something had best be done to correct it pronto. If they are delinquent at the same rate as the general public then a whole lot less should be made of the fact since then it would seem apparent, if it does not already, that a big stink is being made over it only for political gain. Of course the problem should still be addressed but the barbs should be pointed at everyone not just at federal workers if everyone is delinquent at about the same rate. Those required to pay taxes should be held accountable across the board thus the overall problem should be addressed and no group set up as a target to effect political gain.

Steve said...

The question is . . . vote for who?

I'm torn between my inclination to "throw the bums out" and my inability to vote for candidates whose platform is wildly different from my own. I will decide, and I will vote, but it ain't going to be easy.

Arthur B. Burnett said...

Greetings from Texas,
I always vote. Sad truth is I have voted more often to keep someone out of office than I have voted for someone I really liked.

What bugs me about folks with back taxes is the way folks with connections tend to get them 'forgiven' when called on it.