CAVEAT: THIS BLOG CONTAINS (albeit often very childish) ADULT-CONTENT. DISCLAIMER: Entries at this blog are akin to good old-fashioned campfire chats; I offer no opinion on what you should or should not purchase, or what you should be using or doing. What does or does not work for me could be long country-miles away from your tastes and your needs. All products, places, and / or whatnots that I review for this blog are purchased at retail price by me. I do not accept payment, gifts, discounts, freebies, products on loan, demon alcohol, drugs, plea-bargains, probation, parole, Presidential Pardons, or sexual favors for doing any review. TRACKING COOKIES: Google et al sticks tracking cookies on everybody. If you are online, you are being spied on; 'nuff said. You may be able to minimize your online footprints by using Tor and Duck Duck Go. Vive la liberté! Vive all y'all! Ante omnia armari. To each of you, thanks for stopping by!

Sunday, January 28, 2018

The latest Kewel Social Media Craze is "no lackin' a handgun ..."

No, I am not going to post any clips of the photos / videos here at this blog site.  CLICK HERE if you want to see and read about the latest madness.  An episode in Memphis went bad ...

Absit iniuria verbis.  No skin color has a monopoly on stupidity;  if not already, dumbass whites will be doing this soon, provided that they all don't first choke to death on Tide pods ...


Do not point a gun at anything you do not wish to destroy.


Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Winchester 94 AE Ranger .30-30

Winchester 94 AE Ranger
Overall Length = 38 inches
Weight = 6.25 lbs
Barrel Length = 20 inches
Barrel Twist = 1 turn in 12 inches
Cartridge = .30-30 Winchester
Magazine Capacity = 6 round (tubular magazine)

Manufacture of Winchester rifles and shotguns in the USA ceased in 2006.  I purchased this Model 94 AE Ranger new sometime between 1992 and 2002 (I'll dig out the records when I get a chance and update my memory along with this blog entry).   I may have purchased this rifle from a Kmart store; I paid somewhere around $200 if memory serves.  Purists lament the cost saving manufacturing changes that were used post 1964, but I am of the opinion that the final years of USA manufacturing were not bad at all; this is a jim-dandy knockabout .30-30 carbine.



THE FOLLOWING IS FROM WIKIPEDIA  (CLICK HERE for the entire Wikipedia article)
... U.S. Repeating Arms did not flourish, declaring bankruptcy in 1989. It was subsequently purchased by Belgian arms maker FN Herstal, which set about improving the whole Winchester line, instituting modern CNC methods of production at Winchester's (USA) factory while also seeking to expand the sales and marketing of Winchester rifles worldwide. This effort would culminate in two major changes to the gun in 1992: the reintroducing of now-CNC-machined parts and solid pins back into the action, and the elimination of the traditional half-cock safety notch on the hammer in favor of a cross-bolt safety, which enabled the gun to be sold internationally.
Though the increase in build quality was noted at the time, it was the conspicuous presence of the new safety that generated the strongest opinions. It was widely reviled by American consumers and gun writers alike as a "lawyer" safety, who said it detracted from the overall look, feel, and operation of the rifle. FNH and Winchester responded in 2003 by moving the safety to the tang behind the receiver, which largely quelled the controversy. Both the last Model 94s to leave the New Haven factory before American production ceased in 2006 and the new Model 94s produced in Japan since 2010 by Miroku Corp. feature these tang-mounted safeties



The AE in the name designates the action as being Angle Eject; meaning the spent cases would be ejected more to the side rather then straight up; this allowed mounting a scope farther back towards the shooters eye.  However, a low mounted scope could get in the way of a thick-handed shooter being able to thumb the hammer ... so a removable (and ambidextrous) knurled pin was factory supplied to be screwed into the side of the hammer as an extension.

The receiver came from the factory drilled and tapped for mounting a scope.



Back when I bought this box of ammo I probably thought the store (now long gone) was price-gouging.  









Sunday, January 7, 2018

Boito .410 Double Barrel Shotgun

Gosh, it has been so many years ... I plumb forgot this old estate-sale gun was hiding in the back of the safe.   At a distance, it is almost downright pretty.  Close up, the manufacturing shortcuts are obvious with the wood not marrying to the steel, etc.  Fit and finish aside, albeit a bit on the heavy for a .410, I once fancied it to be a decent enough woodland walking-gun for whacking wappidly wunning wascawwy wabbits but life got in the way of dreams and it just sat idle.   Sometimes we neglect our dreams for too long ... no longer are there woodlands nearby that are readily available for hunting.  Maybe next season ... maybe just a few miles further down the road.





The tang safety functions as intended.  The barrel release lever is solid in the frame but it flags left and right of center (the full width of the tang) when the action is closed;  the barrels do lock up safe and solid (as they should) but such malfitting of parts drives purists nuts.






I keep snap caps in both chambers.  Utility grade guns such as this often don't have firing pins that will endure very much empty chamber dry fire.





This line of shotguns was manufactured by Boito of Brazil and sold at Kmart stores until the mid 1980s.  Call it what it was meant to be; an affordable utility grade gun; an entry level gun; a knockabout gun; a gun for poor folks.  As humble as it is, with care and responsible use it should provide many years of active shooting service.   Wabbits best beware ...





Monday, January 1, 2018

This Blog Author Supports TARGETED MANDATORY DRUG TESTING


I speak of drug-testing those who feed at the high-end of the public-money trough, beginning with the POTUS and then on down through the vast herd of federal politicians and employees.  Some taxpayers may settle for a once-a-week random urine sample from each of the high-and-mighty, verified by publicly available video.  However, since many of us are used to politicians pissing all over us, a vast majority of citizen might prefer the poetic justice of witnessing blood being drawn from each of the federal parasites. 

If for nothing more, we need to do this for all the underemployed phlebotomists and their children.