Sunday, May 24, 2009

Browning Semi Auto .22 Takedown Rifle








Above is another slice of my contingency equipment, one of the “go bags” ready for tossing into the evacuation vehicle on short notice. Depending on the part of the country we are traveling to, it sometime comes along as an essential piece of vacation luggage.

The fitted rifle case is old, but I don’t believe it is as old as the rifle it houses.
Browning still offers a fitted case for the .22 takedown rifle but it has a different look and I am not certain that the newer cases are made in the USA. My old case has plenty of room for extras, such as the 800 rounds of LR ammo, weatherproof matches, space blanket, light raingear, spare pocketknife, etc. The case that Browning currently offers looks to be just as accommodating. (NOTE: I may lower the spare ammo to 500 rounds; the current weight may be stressing the carrying-handle pins on the case. I also want to mention that the brands of ammo carried have proven to be reliable in this firearm. Different brands, each brand of the same production lot, are carried just in case the rifle suddenly becomes “picky”; switching ammo brands often can “fix” a .22 semi auto rifle or pistol feed problem. This rifle has proven to be superbly reliable; otherwise, it would not be suitable for contingencies. The different ammo brands are “just in case.”)

Production of the
Browning semi auto .22 rifle began in 1914 and continues today, another of the enduring John Moses Browning designs. It once was the premier small caliber rifle for woodland adventures, commonly mentioned by writers in all the outdoor magazines. Weighing in at a nominal 5 pounds, 38’’ overall assembled length, 19’’ barrel, 11 rounds of .22 LR in the tubular butt magazine, it is a well-balanced hunting or hiking companion, accurate, reliable, and durable. Many suggest it as a good choice for a survival firearm. Bring your big-boy or big-girl wallet if you choose one of these; even the grade 1 rifles, new or used, can be pricey.

I bought this rifle used, from an individual, so many years ago that I cannot remember when it was or even if the case came with it. This rifle was made in Belgium in 1959; in 1974 manufacturing of the Browning .22 rifle moved to Miroku, Japan.
The manual that I downloaded from the Browning website says, “You will find the serial number of your rifle stamped at the lower rear of the right side of the receiver.” On rifles as old as this one, these are no serial number at that location. In fact, I cannot find anything on the rifle that looks like a serial number matching any pattern that Browning documents. Information I found at this site is what dates this rifle to 1959.Click here to date your Browning firearm.

Click here to read Xavier’s article on the Browning .22 rifle

89 comments:

Borepatch said...

I don't know which is yummier, the rifle or the case.

I'm a sucker for old guns.

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Yeah man, I'm with you on that. Old guns are like holding history.

Wild Ed said...

One of the great rifles of our time.

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Wild Ed, you sure got that right. The day Browning quits making this rifle will be the day many of us realize that our time has come and gone.

James R. Rummel said...

Does the scope keep its zero when you disassemble it like that?

James

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hi, James. Thanks for visiting.

I have to zero it each time the scope is mounted in order to achieve 1 minute of squirrel head.

Hammer said...

Yep, that was the .22 I learned on. My uncle still has it.

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hammer, it takes you back, doesn't it?

Ed Harris said...

I had a Browning autoloader and regret having gotten old it. Mine had Unertl scope blocks on the barrel. I used a 6X Small Game scope on it and killed alot of squirrels. It would shoot inch 10-shot groups at 50 yards using almost any cheap brand of ammunition and was 3/4 inch or less with good lots of match ammo it liked. In the "survival ruck gun" mode you can store these with the mag tube loaded and chamber empty, and readily reassemble after single-loading the chamber and have the gun ready to shoot in a few seconds. My kit contained a dozen pre-loaded gallery tubes for rapid reloads. The Norinco Chinese copies are not as well finished, but shoot fairly well, though not as good as the older Belgian guns. The almost identical Remington Model 24 made before WWII is also a good find if you are lucky. I replaced the Browning in my SR with a High Standard Model B with 6-3/4 inch barrel which was given to me by a bush pilot friend. I still have the Model B which rides in my ruck.

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hey Ed, thanks for stopping in again.

Yep, most everyone that I have met that let go of an old Browning .22 say they regret doing it.

If I didn't have such an assortment of old .22 rifles laying around, I would get a Ruger 10/22. IMHO, for the money it is the best little .22 autoloader currently being made.

Anonymous said...

Browning definitely has a winner here. I am a bit confused about dating this rifle and hope you can help me out. The rifle is 22 long rifle made in belgium. On the receiver face where the barrel connects the number is 9T 7106. According to the data this suggests it was manufactured in 1959? However the serial number falls in with the short rifle not the long rifle?

Thanking you in advance for any help you can give.

Steve

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hey Steve,

Sorry man, you got me on that one. T (I believe) always designates Long Rifle and A or E designates .22 Short.

These old rifles just sometimes don't fit in with published serial number information. If I find anything solid, I'll post it here.

Please let us know if you solve this puzzle.

Thanks for visiting!

Zack

Anonymous said...

HI,I live in wisconsin and I just got mind.It's made in Belgium how much is the going rate for my new rifle?

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Value depends on different things; if it is an engraved model in pristine condition the price can be quite high. Utility grade guns go for much less. I haven't kept up on current prices.

Thanks for stopping in!

asuarez said...

Hi Zachary, I really like your rifle! The scope is a nice, compact-looking one. May I ask which brand/model it is? In addition, I wonder if yours feels a tad loose when you put it together. I can feel a little bit of play in mine, but it still shoots tight little groups.

Thanks!
Clayton

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hey Clayton, great to have you stop in. I believe the scope is an old Tasco that (I think) I swiped from an old Marlin .22 that I bought used. It's a good solid fit on the old Browning. If I get a chance to dig everything out, I'll update this reply with whatever markings are on the scope... it may be a while, I am trying to get some home projects done before winter sets in and I am moving slower nowadays ;)

Everything still assembles tight on this old rifle. .

Take care,

Zack

Anonymous said...

Wow nice! My Dad bought his new in 1970 for $80. Almost 40 years later and tens of thousands of rounds it is still going strong. Love the bottom eject on these.

Anonymous said...

To reply to Clayton about his being "loose"....the barrel has an "adjusting ring" that is used to adjust the tightness of the mating pieces. Small "clicks" can be heard when adjusting. Make 1 click adjustments counter-clockwise (if it is loose) until you have a proper seat/fit of the two pieces. This is straight out of the SA 22 owners manual
Jeff

Anonymous said...

just got an old wheelsight $450 s# t93xx is it one of the first 10,000 s# is on stock and between barrel and reciever

Anonymous said...

I have this same gun, curious if youve ever had a first round feed problem, just started, now i have to single load the first round.. any help?

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Sorry, but I don't have any suggestions. I have been lucky with mine so far (and I don't dig it out for much practice since it is so old).

Hope it all works out for you. Few things are more frustrating than a finicky semi-auto.

Anonymous said...

Just picked up an old wheel sight with a serial of T600XX, I'm told one of the first 100 weapons off the line in 1956. No numbers prior to the T. Calling Browning to confirm maybe. Grandson will love it...in 8 years.

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Congrats! That is a great find, a wonderful gift for your Grandson.

Thanks for stopping by.

Best,

Zack

Wes said...

Hello,
I was digging around in the attic and came across the browning 22 auto that i was given about 25 years ago. My Dad doesn't really remember how he came across it before he gave it to me. Its got to be the sweetest shooting,dead on accurate firearm EVER!!I love it and wouldn't sell it for anything.I started trying to date it but am more confused now then when i started.The only numbers on the gun are on the mating surface between the barrel and receiver,it reads T 2125 it also has the number 33 stamp vertical, one 3 over top of the other 3 the opposite direction of the T2125 Does any one have a clue what these means.Thanks

Anonymous said...

Just purchases a lovely '63 Belgian Grade I with the original Browning 4X scope mounted. Cost: $1,100

Jeff Scott said...

Just got a 1973 Grade I with scope and Browning case that was fitted for the attached scope. I think this is one of the first Miroko Japan guns due to the caliber and date code is after the serial number. But who cares as this gun is going to live at the range. Great site!

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hey Jeff, thanks for stopping by and for the kind words. Congrats on scoring that Grade 1. There does not seem to be many of them to found on the gun store racks.

Take care.

Zack

Anonymous said...

I know that everyone likes the belgium made guns, but I grew up in a Japanese/American town in Northern Cal., and I have a deep respect for what passes for excellence in that culture..... Japan is famous worldwide for its metallurgy and its woodworking, and belgium isn't. My Japanese browning is perfect, and all of the levels of polish on it are consistent in the extreme. If manufacturing moves from there, we'll be really nostalgic...
The belgium made guns are just older, the newer japanese guns are excellent and the japanese scope mount is simple and brilliant with no need to reset zero. The best scope is the little redfield 4x, sadly no longer produced.

rimefire22 said...

Iused to have one of these little Brownings with the same case shown in the picture . I had a Redfield 4 power scope and mount made for the gun .The scope looked like a large rifle scope only it was about 2/3 sized . The mount atached to the barrel but came back over the receiver so the scope always stayed with the barrel . It fit the case perfect .Off of sand bags it would shoot 1/2 at 50 yards. You never had to resight it .I had to sell it a while back to pay doctor bills . I had it sence 1972 .I still get water in me eyes when i think about it and these pictures made it worse . Its good to read other peoples view .                                Don B

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hey there, Don B. Thanks for your comments. I'm very sorry to hear that you had to give up a favorite gun, I've had to the same on a few occasions; it is never easy. Hope all is well for you.

Great to have you stop in!

Best regards,

Zack

Anonymous said...

What a beauty you have, Zack! @ Don B. -- I also know the pain of having to sell a treasured rifle to pay necessary bills. In my case it was a Marlin 39A, c. 1959, with a gorgeous figured walnut stock. "Watery eyes" indeed; a recent trip to the local gun shop made me realize how little I got for this gem, especially since the new models seem so cheap in comparison, with rather "plasticky" looking stocks that nevertheless are being sold as "walnut."

Hey Zack, I have a question about the SA-22, maybe you can answer? I have always wondered -- what is the purpose of the indent/cut-out on the right side of the stock? It looks a bit like a thumbhole, but it doesn't go all the way through, and it's not really in the right place for a thumb -- is it?

-- Mike

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hey Mike, nice to have you stop in.

That is the loading port for the cartridges. Pull the magazine plunger tube back from the butt of the stock (but not all of the way out), then slide the cartridges into the port, push the plunger back in and then lock it into place.

Some folks don't use the loading port; they pull the plunger tube all of the way out and slide the cartridges in from the butt of the stock.

Anonymous said...

Hello-
I just picked up a '67 Browing 22, and the original finish looks good, but as it is over 40 yeasr old, quite easily scuffs and scratches- seems like the finish is dried out.
How will refinishing the stock and foregrip alte rthe value of the rifle?

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

I'm not an expert, so I cannot give you an answer on this. IMHO, home restored gun-wood rarely turns out well. Professional restoration can be pricey and may cost you more than what you can sell the restored gun for. Some of the gun forums may be able to give you a better answer. Good luck and thanks for stopping in!

Marc said...

Thanks for the reply- I agree- and as handy as I think I am, still am hesitant about refinishing the wood myself...
glad i found the blog- lots of good input from everyone
any good references for gunsmithing in the CT/NY/MA area?

Marc said...

Hello again-
just a though on the first round feed problem. I also experienced trouble with the firstround feeding smoothly. I spoke with the range officer who had some experience with these, along with a gunsmith at the local shop- they both suggested a rapid flick of the finger piece on the breechblock instead of a slower cycle. I tried it, and if I rapidly and firmly try to chmaber the first round, it works well.

Anonymous said...

i just bought my husband this same gun for his birthday, he wanted it badly when he saw it. i paid $400.00 and it is in great condition, did i get a good deal? Not that it matters, he loves it and that is priceless to me.

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Without seeing the gun it is hard to say, but offhand it sounds like a fair deal. It has been quite a while since I saw one on a gun-store rack listed for less than the amount you paid.

Your husband is lucky to have you for a wife :)

Marc said...

I agree- he's a lucky guy

I have seen 1960's Belgium made 22's in good to very good condition from $300-500 in local gunshops, and priced upwards of $600 and higher on some classified sites, so I think that you paid a fair price/

Anonymous said...

I love the little rifle being a lefty and not liking the 10-22's propensity to dump powder specs in my eye. I found a wheel sight model in a gunshop. It's about 85%. The bore looks good. The gun is definitely a shooter, not a collector piece. They're asking $399.00. Is that a good deal?

Anonymous said...

does anyone know where to get a feed tube for these guns? I was told that they were more popular outside the US and that nobody carries them in the states

DB Woody said...

I've found a SA-22 Made In Japan SHORT.According to the serial it was made in 1980 and is a grade 1.I've looked at several web sights,and can find only info on the long rifle and nothing on the short which I'm presuming means {short only}.Can you still buy 22 shorts? Anyway thought you might could shed some light! Can buy for $300. It has gun rack marks close to end of barrel and a couple small dings in stock,other than that pretty nice.You have a nice set-up!!! Thanks for listening and any help!! DB Woody

Marc said...

For the feed tube question...have you tried calling Briwning service? the numbers for customer support are on the website- I have dealt with them in the past, and they've shown me that they are interested in helping. hope you find the part-

Anonymous said...

I have a no serial # belgin grade I wheel sight version. Mag tube will not stay in. What holds it in?

Anonymous said...

I talked to them today. they were not helpfull just wanted me to send them the gun

Anonymous said...

In response to the feed tube question, try Midwest Gunworks:
http://www.midwestgunworks.com/page/mgwi/ctgy/browning-autoloading-takedown-22-rifle-parts.

Anonymous said...

I am in a bind and have to sell my 1974 Japan .22 Browning with the same case, owners manual and keys still in the original packaging. It is like brand new. Anyone interested?? I have an offer from the Browning Historical guy, but would like more. If anyone ready to buy, email me at joebra@excite.com. I have to sell by Monday.

Anonymous said...

I just acquired the .22 semi-auto rifle and was so glad to learn more about it on your blog. I crave the takedown feature and the simple lines. Unless I missed something, the Browning site doesn't specify the date for serial numbers beginning with T followed by 5 numbers. (No letters or numbers before the T and only numbers after) Someone else also asked this in a previous post. Does anyone know? Is it safe to assume that since it has a serial number at all, the manufacture date is likely after 1950's? Thanks for any information.

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

I wish I could help you out, but the more I read about some of the older Browning .22 take-down rifles the more confused I get. What some people assumed were serial numbers may have been part numbers. Hard to say for sure on some of these old treasures.

Anonymous said...

I have a rifle just like this one in mint condition (no scratches, or dings in the stock). It has no serial numbers. I was looking to sell it. Any idea what it worth? thanks

Anonymous said...

I have an 1950 Browning semi-auto 22 SHORT with thumwheel sight graded locally by a gunsmith at 95%. There is no serial number on this gun. It was a Christmas Gift from my father in Dec. of 1951. The gun has not been fired in 35 to 40 years. Does anyone have any idea as to the gun's value. I am not interested in selling the gun just interested in it,s value.

Dan Bergmen said...

I just picked up my brand new SA-22 last Thursday (5-24-2010). It was a little spendy ($670.00) but I was glad to see it on the rack since not many gunshops carry them.

This rifle is flawlessly executed and a beauty to behold. Magnificent. Crisp trigger, outstanding accuracy, comes to the shoulder like it was custom made for me.

What a great firearm, it will add nicely to my collection.

Dan

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hey there Dan, thanks for stopping by. Glad you were able to score one of these little gems; a true classic.

Anonymous said...

Does anybody know where you could buy a new stock for one of these? My stock has a chip in it and a lost the chipped peice so I need a new one. I've been lookin but couldn't find anything.

Marc said...

You can buy new from Browning or Midway or Midwest...other supply companies have new stocks for sale..but they are EXPENSIVE

if I can find a site again, I will post here

Marc said...

Here is a link to Midwest gun works...

http://www.midwestgunworks.com/page/mgwi/ctgy/browning-autoloading-takedown-22-rifle-butt-stocks

Anonymous said...

Just got a new in box 1984 model. no papers.
Fellow next door passed on and his wife said "take it". I said no to that.
Am thinking to give her $500/$550. Fair?
It's pretty.

Anonymous said...

I have a Belguim made 22 takedown S#T59336 in the original case. I was wondering if you have any idea of its worth. Condition is fair a few minor scratches and some wear on the case nothing major.

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

I wish I could help, but I no longer offer guesses on gun values. Maybe someone else will read your post and offer some insight.

Best,

Zack

Anonymous said...

I Have been trying to date my take down 22 simi with no luck. I have seven numbers stamped on the bottom of barrel 6137197 Can you help out with a date??

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hmmmm... I checked around and came up empty using that number.

The Browning website says that if their online files can't date your firearm, call their Consumer Department directly at: 800.333.3288 or 801.876.2711

Let us know if that works out for you.

Thanks for stopping in!

Zack

Anonymous said...

This is a fine blog and I've enjoy reading everybody's comments.

I would love to own one of these fine weapons but I'm right-handed and left-eyed.

Is it possible to modify this rifle's stock a few degrees so as to make it a crossover stock?

Would the geometry of the magazine which already is at an angle to the bore/receiver's axis allow this modification?

Does anybody think it would still feed reliably?

Has anybody even heard of a crossover stock SA-22?

Finally, are John Ciener integrally suppressed SA-22's finely made? Does anybody know how quiet they are?

John Moses Browning was a master of both form and function. Shooting game is triple enjoyment. 1.) You get to test your skill in nature 2.) You enjoy yummy meat at the table 3.) You enjoy the pride of ownership of the fine weapon that allowed you to enjoy both 1 and 2.

Thank you in advance.

Anonymous said...

Hi, Last year I bought a grade 1 engraved SN 2T32164 I think that means 1962, The rifle also has an original browning 4X D45178 model scope on it. The gun is perfect like new and looks like it was never fired. I bought it as soon as I saw it for $500.00 It is an awesome rifle. I enjoyed reading all the comments here. Thanks Kevin

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Sounds like a great buy, Kevin!

Anonymous said...

How can I determine the date of manufacture on my SA-22. Serial # is 02001FX245. This # does not correspond with any of the sites I have found so far. I believe it is a relatively new rifle (5 or 10 years maybe), and is a Grade 2. Was made in Japan. Thanks, Jim

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Jim, please let us know if you find anything on this. My guess is that they again re-standardized their numbers and Browning has not updated their reference site.

blackrandom said...

Where can I find a scope mount for this rifle? I have been searching everywhere for one but to no avail.

Phiggles said...

I learned to shoot with one of these in the late 40's and still had that rifle in 95 when draconian gun laws were forced through in Australia and anything with auto in the description was gone. Mine was crushed. Imagine my delight when I came to Canada to visit my grandsons and found "auto" was OK. They now have one and they work as flawlessly now as they did in 1948.

Anonymous said...

left NY and moved to Colorado in 1976. i was in the hardware store in Dillon co. i paid $200 for a sa 22 grade I new off the rack. i live in palmdale ca now, i fond a 1964 sa 22 and paid $ 199 in 2006. my favorite guns that i have. they are so different, at the range i never see any one else with one. both shoot dead on.
John Moses Browning genius
mini 14
s & w 1522
rem 70a 308
rem 243
s & w sigma 9mm
browning camper 22
ruger black hawk 357
colt lawman III 357
ati 1911-22
780 12 gauge
rem 1148 16 gauge

Doctor Stu said...

Scope mounts for the SA-22 are produced by Browning and available from Optics Planet. The new rifles are tapped for these specific bases and rings.

Doctor Stu said...

Mounting bases and scope rings are made by Browning for the SA-22. They will hold a 1" diameter scope with no more than a 40 mm objective. I got mine from Optics Planet

Anonymous said...

I would first like to say thanks for the welth of info on this post. I found your site by pure accident as I was searching for info on a little Browning SA-22 that was up for sale or trade. As it turned out I traded a Ruger MKIII 22/45 for it. It has some minor rust and pitting in a few places on the barrel and there is some water stains on the butt. I just dated it, thanks to the links and found it was born in 1961 . Is there a general rule against restoration of these fine little rifles. The pitting can be removed if lightly sanded but I do not want to ruin its value by doing so. The stock has crazing cracks in the varnish and the mentioned water stains but other than that is in good + condition. I am on the fence about restoration or preservation. Thank you again for all the good info. Rick in Wisconsin.

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Hey there Rick,

Ron's Gun Shop (Oshkosh, Wisconsin) is famous for their restorations. Maybe they could give you an opinion.

http://www.ronsgunshop.com/

LFK8 said...

Just bought a Belgium 1958 sa-22 with very light rust spots on the barrel and reciever. Am refinishing it now. I believe the refinishing won't effect the selling price if done well, although I don't ever want to sell it.

urracadan said...

Greetings RIck,
I bought a new SA22 grade 1 6 months ago, went through barrel break in, made a fitted case etc. etc. I see from your pics the scope is mounted to the receiver. How did you accomplish this? My manual says to remove the rear sight, buy a mount and use the holes in the barrel.

LFK8 said...

Just a followup. I have finished the restoration of my SA22 and it really looks good. After rebluing the barrel I refinished the forend where some of the original finish was flaking off. Doesn't look brand new but close.

juice 67 said...

Greetings,,
Has anyone experienced problems taking a .22 cal. Browning Semi Auto
take down rifle down? Mine seems like it is locked up. I just acquired the gun. It is in excellent condition but it doesn't want to breakdown. Could the previous owner have over tightened the barrel take up adjustment?

Best regards, Juice 67

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Juice 67, thanks for stopping in.

The URL below (copy and paste into your browser window) is to a video that includes a short take-down clip.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLuTGSBjMHE

Anonymous said...

Hi
My 1975 browning has engraving on the receiver. Do you know what grade that would be ?
Thanks
Norm

Anonymous said...

I purchased my Browning 1956 takedown (made in Belgium) in 1962 on base in Fairbanks, Alaska. It came with a 2X scope. I have never shot a more accurate rifle before. I have it willed to my Granddaughter. It would be interested in knowing it 's monetary value. It still shoots and looks like new.





Anonymous said...

Arts gun shop has a video on these guns and would anwser a lot of your questions. Video is a must see for browning SA-22 owners

Anonymous said...

I just picked up 1 of these Browning Takedowns from a friend of my dads I believe its a 1963 according to the serial # but I am having a problem with accuaracy? it seems to be all over the place even at 20 yards with a scope (seems to stay in about a 14" diameter) There also seems to be just a little play in when the barrel is locked on would this cause the lack of accuracy? the gun is in great shape so i'm not sure why there seems to be this bit of movement and lack of accuracy I hear everyone above saying how acuarate they are Please Help!

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

There is a small toggle-latch at the base of the underside of the forearm; it pushes forward toward the muzzle end of the barrel to unlock, and it pushes back toward the breach to lock. It is possible that the barrel is not locked in, causing the looseness. If that isn't the problem, contact Browning or a gunsmith.

I have had horrid accuracy from some .22 rifles and pistols when the barrel starts accumulating lead in parts of the barrel. If it is severely leaded, the barrel may need the attention of a gunsmith.

Thanks for stopping by, and good luck!

Best

Zack


James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Copy and paste the url below into your browser window. Part of the video shows the toggle-latch I mentioned above. I prefer leaving the entire strip down cleaning to a good gunsmith, but some folks enjoy doing it themselves.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVFu_IiqcK0

fteter said...

About barrel tightness and accuracy. "Anonymous" is correct in assuming that a loose barrel fit can mess up accuracy. Had a similar problem. Maybe what I went through will help.

When you "takedown" the rifle (remove the barrel), you'll find two rings on the end of the barrel that screws into the receiver. The barrel lock ring (which has the locking toggle on it) and the barrel adjusting ring immediately behind it. As the forearm wood under the barrel ages, the barrel lock ring tends to slip forward, which prevents a tight lock between the barrel and the receiver when you put the gun back together.

The fix that worked for me was: 1) turn the barrel adjusting ring (the serrated ring immediately behind the barrel lock ring) as far up the barrel as it will go. 2) Gently push the barrel lock ring as far up the barrel as it will go (you should see most of the threads from the barrel sticking in front of the barrel lock ring). 3) Reassemble the gun - VERY IMPORTANT: don't turn the barrel when reassembling, turn the receiver. See page 6 of the owner's manual at http://media.browning.com/pdf/om/22semiautomanual.pdf for a visual on this. 4) Lock down the toggle switch as Mr. Zachary described earlier in this comment thread. 5) If you have any wobble at all, use the barrel adjusting ring to tighten things up.

Sorry for the long comment. Hope this helps!

Anonymous said...

What type of a sling would you put on this rifle? Thanks

James A. Zachary Jr. said...

Never gave a sling on this rifle any thought. A sling would make sense in some situations.

Tara said...

Such a classic - beautiful photos too!

Dean C said...

My father just gave me his 1964 model. Always loved this rifle. Can't wait to shoot it with my son.