Photo above is my Great Great Grandfather, Civil War Veteran, Company C, First Kentucky Cavalry, U.S.

Mom and Dad had antecedents on both sides of that bloody conflict. Counties were split, towns were split, and families were split. It was never as simple as being the north versus the south.

The Preacherman says, "My advice to you is to get yourself a gun and learn how to shoot." The Gunman says, "My advice to you is to get yourself a Bible and learn how to pray."

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TRIGGER WARNING: Guns have triggers.

REQUISITE DISCLAIMER: Entries at this blog are akin to good old-fashioned campfire chats; I offer no opinion on what you should or should not purchase, or what you should be using or doing. What does or does not work for me could be many country-miles away from your tastes and your needs. Any products, places, and / or whatnots that I review for this blog are purchased at retail price by me. I do not accept payment, gifts, discounts, freebies, products on loan, demon alcohol, drugs, probation, parole, Presidential Pardons, or any flavor of sexual favor for doing any review.

EU TRACKING COOKIE NOTICE: Google bakes those scrumptious cookies and everything Google cooks usually means something related is up for sale. We appreciate our many visitors from inside and outside of the USA and feel obligated to mention that YOUR RESPECTIVE GOVERNMENTS MAY KNOW THAT YOU WERE HERE and they may not approve of you perusing the blog entries regarding GUNS ... KNIVES ... SELF-DEFENSE ... CORRUPT POLITICIANS ... SELF-SERVING ROGUE GOVERNMENT AGENCIES ... GOVERNMENT SPYING ON CITIZENS ... Human Rights ... Freedom of Speech ... Life ... Liberty ... Pursuit of Happiness ... all that kind of stuff.

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Illinois Switchblade Knife Ban REPEALED

(PHOTO SOURCE = Hell if I can remember: SORRY!)

This one is for JonT!


CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

BRIEF SUMMARY = No FOID CARD (or a Concealed Carry License) means NO CLICK KNIFE FOR YOU!  Don't carry in Chicago, which has knife laws akin to Great Britain.

Seriously, in all the decades of my life here in Illinois, not a year went by without me seeing at least one person sporting a switchblade.  Knife bans are silly.  Knife bans do not keep knives out of peoples hands, pockets, or purses.




Saturday, August 19, 2017

REVIEW: Randolph Aviator Sunglasses. I bought 'em, I wear 'em, I like 'em.

My money, my choice.



A well made, durable case for protecting the glasses when they are not perched on my melon.


Microfiber cleaning cloth. 

Spare parts and a toolkit stored in a pouch crafted into the lining of the case.

Spare screws for the temples and frame, spare nose pads, and a hidden screwdriver.





Saturday, August 12, 2017

Is your favorite website or blogsite blocked by the Russian Government?

(NOTE:  to have Google check the SAFETY of a site you want to visit, click the following link and then enter the site's URL to obtain a health check.   https://transparencyreport.google.com/safe-browsing/search )  This assumes that Google is being righteous ...

As a backdrop on Internet censorship in Russia, click the following link and read an informative Newsweek article (7/31/2017).  http://www.newsweek.com/how-vladimir-putin-cracked-down-russias-internet-644176




SOME DUDE just launched a free, non-profit, online-tool called BlockedInRussia.com. It lets anyone check to see if a website is blocked in Russia.  Click on over there and see if something you see in your locale has been whacked by the Russian Government.

How does SOME DUDE perform this magic?  Hell, I dunno ...



EDIT:  as of 8/13/2017  (just to check things out)
http://www.drudgereport.com is NOT blocked in Russia.
https://www.voanews.com is NOT blocked in Russia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_censorship_in_Russia#Blacklist_law IS blocked in Russia





Saturday, July 29, 2017

Thursday, July 27, 2017

The British Versus GUNS

An interesting read. CLICK on the photo below to link on over to the article ... 

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Let's put a 4'' semi-auto pistol and 200-rounds of ammo in this little box

 Can it be done?






PRESTO!  

I am very fond of this cute little Minx.  For self-defense, it has limitations but is better than nothing.  
For chasing empty tin-cans around a secured range, it is an afternoon of pure fun.

Every adult on earth should be free to own nothing less and a whole lot more.






Thursday, July 20, 2017

It is time to close all small airports and ban private pilots.

Ban small aircraft and private pilots. Save us from the drug, gun, and illegal-alien smugglers. It's only common sense. CLICK ON THE PHOTO BELOW for the full story. Do it for the children.

Friday, July 14, 2017

HOLSTER REVIEW: Kramer Pocket Holsters for S&W J Frame and Colt D Frame Revolvers

(The Photo Above) All holsters were purchased new, directly from Kramer Handgun Leather.  The holster fitted for the original size J Frame (in the middle) and the holster fitted for the shrouded barrel Colt D Frame (on the right) are between fifteen and twenty-years-old, if my memory serves.  The holster fitted for the revolver having a longer magnum size J frame barrel  (on the left) is around ten-years-old.  Horsehide was the leather used to construct each of these holsters.



The photo above shows the side of the holster that faces toward the body.

To a great extent, the successful use of almost any pocket holster depends on matching it and the handgun to a pocket of suitable size.  A pocket that is too small, too shallow, or too tight can cause concealment and / or access problems.  If a pocket is too large the gun and holster can fail to remain upright.  The Kramer works with most of my trouser right side front pockets.   The Colt D Frame is the most difficult to manage, especially with those hand filling grips that I prefer for it, but it does work.



The photo above shows the side of the holster that faces away from the body.  The plastic panel is intended to break the outline of the handgun, making it less recognizable (for the photo, I highlighted the black nylon stitching with a wax).  Does the panel work as intended?  Well, yeah ... but the bulges from even the small boot grips on a J frame are pretty distinctive and there is nothing the plastic panel can do about that.  I treat pocket carry pretty much the same as I treat my obesity and my IWB and OWB handgun carry; I rely mostly on frumpy oversized untucked shirts to hide my unsightly bulges.



(The Photo Above) Here is my only real complaint: Do you see that line of panel-stitching inside the mouth of the holster?  It's that way on each of the three holsters. The edge of the revolver's cylinder snags that stitching when you draw.  Many holster makers lower such stitching (which is commonly used for adding exotic leather trim or an extra band of leather as a hold-open) to just a wee bit below the level of the top edge of the cylinder in order to avoid a snag point.  NOTE: Each of these holsters is broken in (that takes time and use) and the snagging is not as noticeable as it once was, but it is still there.



The photo above shows that the stitching of each holster has its own personality.  Plenty of hand-time went into making these durable holsters; they will long outlast my remaining time on earth.



(The Two Photos Above) Here is my Kramer that fits the longer barrel Magnum J Frames; it is sporting a Model 60-9 .357 Magnum.  To prevent the hammer from snagging on the pocket fabric while drawing the revolver, (it is generally assumed that) plain-clothes and off-duty cops came up with the technique of riding the tip of the hammer with the tip of the thumb.

The rather plain rectangular design of this holster has no catch-points (other than that area that looks to function more like a hammer shroud) dedicated to keeping the holster in the pocket during the draw.  After all of the years of practice, and with each holster being adequately broken in, they all stay where they belong when I draw.



Thursday, June 29, 2017

HOLSTER REVIEW: Frontline 2202 IWB Holster for Beretta 84 FS Cheetah .380


It does not sit too high and it does not sit too low.  This holster seems to have been designed with some creative input from folks that actually carry the Cheetah for serious business.  I've used this holster often for EDC and I give it high marks.  IMHO, it is probably as good an IWB holster as I am ever going to buy "off the shelf" for the Beretta 84 FS Cheetah.  Besides, not many custom holster makers seem to have this pistol in their library and, to be honest, I just don't feel like taking a chance and investing a couple of hundred dollars into having a custom holster made that may turn out to just plain suck.  For somewhere around $45 out of my pocket, this holster turned out to be a very good value.

CLICK HERE to read about a holster that I was enamored with but ultimately DID NOT WORK OUT at all for me with the Cheetah.

(PHOTO ABOVE) The snaps on the belt loops on this Frontline IWB are not the "directional snaps" that I prefer but they are good quality and are secure enough;  I've been pretty animated while carrying this IWB and I do not recall a snap ever popping unexpectedly.  The holster rides well, hides well, and the pistol stays secure.  I like it.  It works for me.  The holster belt loops are for an 1.5'' belt; belt shown is a MAGPUL Tejas El Original 1.5'' belt.





(PHOTO ABOVE) The leather is good quality and stitching is very decent.  
The extra band of leather at the mouth of the holster is both a sweat-shield and a hold-open that actually works.  Re-holstering the pistol is smooth and instinctive. 




(PHOTO ABOVE) For IWB, my preference is for leather holsters like this with leather straps and quality snaps.
Synthetics just don't work for me.  





(THE TWO PHOTOS ABOVE) Whenever I need to carry the Cheetah in my pants pocket, I simply improvise by using this Frontline IWB holster as a pocket holster.  It fits okay.






Sunday, June 25, 2017

The new roof took only a day. High-fives all around to the owner and the crew-members of Lake County Roofs, Inc.

The (original) ~20-year-old roof came off and the new roof went on in a single workday.  It was a hot day but luckily for the crew it was also overcast and breezy.  We are on a small cul de sac and it was a challenge to not block some of the neighbors' driveways during a project like this.

We didn't try to get our insurance company to pay for any part of the job, although many of our neighbors have done so this year and over the many years prior.   If there had been catastrophic storm damage to the roof, oh you can bet that I would have brought in the adjuster, but this roof was just showing age.  I did notify my insurance company that I expected some sort of rate reduction for being a righteous guy about all of this, else I will be soliciting quotes for our Auto-Home Policy from competing insurance companies after the first of the new year.

For this roofing job, I secured three competitive quotes from properly insured and licensed roofing companies (vetting is a pain but it is worth the time and effort).  The contractor that we used was the smallest outfit of the three bidders and his quote was substantially less than those from the big outfits.


Another project off the list; now on to other pressing matters ...